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Bee Hive Smart Sensor Technology for Optimal Development of the Bees

22. november 2017 - 15:24

This topic is for the beekeepers that would like to know what can we monitor with Bee Hive Smart Sensor Technology with the mission provide optimal development of the bees.

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Honey Bee Colony as Superorganism

26. juuni 2017 - 11:29

The issue 94(1) of Bee World is a Special Issue devoted to the exciting subject of the “superorganism”. A superorganism is an organism consisting of many organisms, and the term is often used to describe a...

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Bee deaths from pesticides threaten nation’s honey and beekeepers in Greece

23. juuni 2017 - 12:29

Bees swarm around Evropi-Sofia Dalampira as she walks along Anel Honey Park’s on-site honeybee colonies next to beekeeper Kostas Boudouths, who is checking his hives. She was leading a tour group of kindergarteners through...

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Welcome to the luxury bee hotel

26. oktoober 2016 - 15:55

By Emma Sarah Tennant I love to watch the bees hard at work in our garden, but often think they deserve a holiday. So I was thrilled to get an email from Fiona Lane...

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First varroa treatment approved for use in Australia

26. oktoober 2016 - 15:54

By Stephen Fleming Apiguard, the organically-approved varroa control treatment from Vita (Europe) Ltd, has just been approved for use in Australia. It is the first varroa control product to be approved by the Australian...

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Where would you like to keep bees?

26. oktoober 2016 - 15:54

By Stephen Fleming I’ve just discovered a fascinating new site featuring Google Earth’s Street View. You have to guess where in the world the Street View location is – and for added beekeeper fun,...

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EyesOnHives: Tool to Revolutionize Honey Bee Hive Monitoring

30. november 2015 - 19:06

Keltronix Inc in the beggining of November announced the launch of EyesOnHivesTM a powerful analytics platform that helps beekeepers, scientists, and other researchers quantify and assess the activity and health of a beehive. With EyesOnHives, beehive activity...

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Beenomics: Developing more Sustanibly Honey Bees

21. november 2015 - 14:08

Can you imagine to rear honey bee colonies resistant to varroa and other bee diseases, with the capability to increase honey production and overcome harsh winters? “Hot dream” of every beekeeper can soon become a...

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European Honey Breakfast – 20 November 2015

17. november 2015 - 16:55

This year the Honey Breakfast will take place in quite a few countries: Slovenia, Hungary, Austria, the Czech Republic, and Romania. In 2014, Hungary and Romania started organising the European Honey Breakfast and they...

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Portrait of a bee biologist – Tom Seeley

22. august 2015 - 13:23

Tom Seeley is probably the most famous living bee biologist, renowned as author of a number of major books such as “The wisdom of the hive” and “Honey bee democracy”. In the latest issue...

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Losses of honey bee colonies over the 2014/15 winter

27. juuli 2015 - 14:42

The honey bee research association COLOSS has announced the preliminary results of their international study of colony losses over the 2014-15 winter. Data were collected from 31 countries. Egypt, Russia and the Ukraine participated for the...

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44th Apimondia: Early-Registration period EXTENDED

7. juuli 2015 - 11:45

Early-registration period has been extended until July 12th, 2015. If you missed the chance to register for the discounted price, grab this chance. This will be the last chance you can get it because...

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Crowdfunding campaign: WiFi for your beehive

3. juuli 2015 - 9:18

New Zealand based beekeeping technology company, Hivemind Ltd, have released a new WiFi beehive scale and smartphone app that will allow urban beekeepers, bee educators and researchers, to better monitor their bees and more...

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Apitourism – A Fusion of Apiculture & Sustainable Travel Experience

26. juuni 2015 - 22:44

Some people call it Natural. Others call it Green. Beekeepers call it Api (from the Latin apis which means bee).

Api travel experience can provide an opportunity to be intrigued by the mystic world of bees. Not only to learn about different bee products, a number of which enjoy medicinal applications, but to get as close to bees as you want. As a visitor on an api tour, beekeepers will invite you to enter a bee house, where you can listen to the relaxing buzz of the bees, which has been proven to have a positive effect on a person’s state of mind.

You can also reward yourself with bio honey massage or thermotherapy and enjoy api beneficent fragrance of the hives. In Slovenia for example, a country of unique apiculture and long beekeeping tradition, the beekeepers place beds within bee houses, thereby transforming the bee house into an apitherapeutic chamber. It is believed that pollen allergies can be cured through the regular and timely inhalation of air from beehives.

Travel as inspiration, education & enrichment

Apitourism is a new tourism discipline and very fresh approach to sustainability. It aims at raising awareness as to the importance of bees to mankind, enriching knowledge about the use and effects of bee products and apitherapy, and enhancing people’s well-being. Api tours create a new dimension of travel that raises awareness as to the importance of our natural world, together with such fundamental values as health, family, creativity, connection and harmony in life’s fulfilment. They combine country’s distinctive heritage and its rich beekeeping tradition with those travel trends that favour healthy and eco-friendly pursuits.

Api tours, excursions, workshops, trainings, camps – new Travel Experience

ApiRoutes (branded name for Api travel experiences in Slovenia) embraces tours and excursions, as well as education and training programs. Highlights include observations of beekeepers at their work, introductions to apiarian techniques focusing on biodynamic beekeeping which respects the colony’s natural integrity, demonstrations of various hive systems, presentations of bee pollen, royal jelly and propolis production, together with seminars on their beneficent effects on health and well-being. In addition to visits to beekeeping museums and typical Slovenian bee houses, which are architecturally unique and of extraordinary appeal, we provide opportunities to attend professional seminars, round tables and workshops addressing topics ranging from the manufacture of items from beeswax and beehive panel painting, to making and baking delicious honey dough dishes and sampling sparkling meads.

Api tours also provide insight into the nature, heritage, traditions, foods and hospitality of country’s diverse regions: in Slovenia visitors are welcome to delight in Lake Bled, one of Europe’s most beautiful Alpine resorts, visit Postojna, the most visited show cave in Europe and search for the olm, enjoy Maribor, which boasts the world’s oldest living vine, and pay homage to the memory of a father of modern apitherapy, Dr. Filip Tertsch, see the white Lipizzaner horses at Lipica, relax on the Adriatic coast, take a swim in the sea or just enjoy a walk along the promenade at Portorož, indulge yourself at one of Slovenia’s famous thermal spas and taste the smoked air-dried prosciutto ham and the terra-rossa Teran wine of Slovenia’s Karst.

Apitourism Certificate of Excellence

In an era when people are increasingly attracted by such appellations as locally produced, bio, organic, eco and healthy, the certification of tourist service providers and their products has become an established procedure under a number of this country’s green schemes. These not only extend to the tourist sector, but also apitourism. Slovenia is the first – and as yet the only – country to certify its apitourism service providers and assessment as to their specialisation and orientation is currently underway.

In most cases these providers encompass beekeepers who are target-oriented in their exploitation of opportunities in eco-apiculture, biodynamic apiculture, as well as beekeeping using various beehive systems. In addition, apitourism also embraces other institutions, artisans and service providers, including, queen bee breeders, beekeeping ethnography collections, open-air museums and beekeeping education routes, apitherapists, beehive front panel painters, honey confectioners, beeswax candle-makers, honey-bread and honey-pastry bakers, honey beverage producers, natural api-cosmetic and care product makers, bespoke and specialist gift makers as well as many others.

Apitourism-apicoulture

In their provision of local produce and innovative wellness packages, some also offer food and accommodation to tourists, as well as the possibility to engage in sport and recreational activities. One, two or three bees in a symbol indicate individual providers according to the quality and attraction of their services, their use of nature-friendly materials, specialisation, innovation, efficiency, experience and setting.

A new economic activity on a rise

Unique experience is what people search today. Apitourism, as a novel concept in travel and holidaying, has emerged and developed into an important component of the green economy.

ApiRoutes is demonstrative of the need of having a clear vision, an innovative product and brand, indigenous knowledge, defined markets as well as highly motivated and fully involved partners. In December 2013, ApiRoutes became Co-ordinator of the Apimondia Working Group: Apimondia and Apitourism which is taking a leading role in promoting and encouraging the development of apitourism worldwide.

Apitourism enjoys great potential as an additional opportunity to augment and consolidate the position of beekeepers in a niche tourism market. With its educational role, such tourism brings out the best in destinations and services, the best in people, the best in their perceptions and actions, and it transforms all this awareness and knowledge into an important value to take home, share and live by.

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2015 Vita International Honeybee and Beekeeping Photo Competition

24. juuni 2015 - 16:39

The fourth annual Vita photo competition is now open for entries to anyone with an interest in beekeeping or honeybees.

Winners’ photographs will appear in the 2016 Vita (Europe) Ltd Calendar and they will each receive a copy of the limited edition calendar. There will also be a cash prize plus beekeeping products for the best as judged by an international panel of beekeeping journalists and suppliers.

All suitable entries will also be added to the Vita Gallery, a free online resource of more than 600 honeybee-related photos which is used by beekeeping lecturers and associations across the globe.

Entrants may submit up to four photos (preferably each about 1mb in size) relating to honeybees or beekeeping by emailing them to gallery@vita-europe.com. Photos can be on any relevant topic: from honeybee behaviour, to beekeeping practices, foraging honeybees and honeybee produce.

The outright winner of the competition will receive a €50 cash prize, plus Vita anti-Varroa products for 10 colonies. Runners-up will receive a special package of Vita products. There is also a special prize for the winner of the under-16s category.

The deadline for entries is 18 October 2015.

bee-photo-competition-2015

Sebastian Owen, Commercial Development Manager, at Vita, said:

“I’m very pleased to say that each year our task gets more difficult as the entry numbers and quality increase. The photographs often give insights into the diversity of world beekeeping and last year we were particularly pleased to see many entries from the developing world where beekeeping can often make such a valuable economic impact.”

Terms and Conditions of the 2015 Vita Photo Competition

The competition is open to any individual. Up to four photos (about 1MB each in size) relating to honeybees or beekeeping may be submitted. Please include your name, postcode (or equivalent) and country in your email. You may also include captions for your photographs if you wish.

The deadline for entries to the competition is 18 October 2015.

Entrants must certify that the image/s they are submitting is their own work and that they own the copyright. It is the responsibility of each entrant to ensure that any images they submit have been taken with the permission of the subject and do not infringe the copyright of any third party or any laws. In providing images for the competition, each entrant agrees that Vita can put it in the online Vita Gallery for others to use and in the Vita Calendar. Wherever used, Vita will credit the contributor.

Vita will enter your email address on its mailing list unless you specify otherwise. You can ask for your email address to be withdrawn from the mailing list at any time.

For the cash prize, bank transfer details will be required.

The judges’ decision will be final.

See also: Winner of 2014 Vita Photo Competition

Source: Vita (Europe) Ltd

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Stingless Bee – Diversity in El Salvador

24. juuni 2015 - 0:05

Yes, you read it right, there are bees that cannot sting you.

Actually, they have stingers, but are so reduced that they cannot be used for defense. 500 species big family also Meliponines as they call these bees, you can find them in tropical or subtropical regions (Australia, Africa…).

Keeping Native Stingless Bees New information about stingless bee diversity in El Salvador

So called “stingless” bees have been managed by man in Mesoamerica since the time of the Mayan civilization, but are threatened by deforestation and urbanization, and traditional beekeeping using stingless bees has declined due to greater use of the more easily managed western honey bee.

Despite this, there has hitherto been little information available about stingless bees in El Salvador.

A new study published in 2015 in the Journal of Apicultural Research for the first time provides us with comprehensive information about stingless bee diversity in the country. Stingless bees (Meliponinae) are a very diverse group of social bees native to areas of the world, (the Americas and Australia) where the more common social Apis honey bees are not naturally found. I

n this new study, Dr Carlos Iraheta and colleagues from the University of El Salvador studied bee diversity in each department of the country, the smallest in Central America. They located both wild and managed colonies of stingless bees. Greatly exceeding any previous records, they concluded that at least 20 species of stingless bees are found in the country. They found that the most common wild species was Tetragonisca angustula known locally as Jetaí, and the most common managed species was Melipona beecheii, known locally as Xunan Kab or the Royal Lady bee. They found that the stingless bee species richness was associated with the vegetation cover, increasing with increased coniferous forest and fruit trees, also increasing with temperature, but decreasing with altitude. The authors found that coastal areas deforested for agriculture in the 1930s had no stingless bees present, whether wild or managed.

IBRA Science Director Norman Carreck says:

“It is clear that populations of stingless bees are often fragile and easily influenced by land use changes. This new paper increases our knowledge of the native stingless bees present in this important country. We can only develop efficient strategies for conserving bee diversity if we have reliable information about present abundance”.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingless_bee and IBRA (International Bee Research Association).

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Feel the Magical and Mysterious World of Bees

14. mai 2015 - 13:07

In search of authentic, green and responsible travel – in desire for the experiences which take our breath away, a unique form of tourism is being offered in Slovenia. Apitourism!

This fresh, innovative and sustainable travel activity is built on three major pillars in favour of nowadays traveller: nature, art and spirituality. It aims at raising awareness as to the importance of bees to mankind, enriching knowledge about the use and effects of bee products and apitherapy, and enhancing people’s wellbeing.

Co-developed by Aritours Travel Agency and the Slovenian Beekeepers’ Association, ApiRoutes are branded apitourism products intended for those who like world of bees and the environment, respect life’s diversity and natural laws, and want to experience the miscellany of Slovenia’s nature and culture. In their presentation of innovative apitherapeutic treatments within a typical Slovene bee house, as well as in their depiction of a land rich in apiculture and with a remarkable beekeeping history, api tours lean on time-honoured traditions and unique practices that yield superior honey and a wealth of other products from the hive. Such tours typically include visits to affable beekeepers throughout Slovenia who are forever happy to open their doors to visitors, providing the opportunity to learn about the indigenous Carniolan Bee as well as discover the secrets behind Slovenia’s high-quality apicultural products.

In the words of organizers, the ApiRoutes mission is to

»create an authentic travel experience that raises awareness as to the importance of following natural laws, together with such fundamental values as health, interdependence, respect, creativity and happiness.«

Wordl-of-bees-intro

Highlights of an Api Tour in the World of Bees

ApiRoutes offers a variety of especially themed programs and tours of variable length and intensity which are balanced with sightseeing and entertainment. Api excursions are normally about a week in length, but can be tailored to the needs and preferences of the group. Highlights include observations of beekeepers at their work, introductions to natural laws through the life of bees, presentations of bee pollen, royal jelly and propolis production, the manufacture of items from beeswax and beehive panel painting, to making and baking delicious honey dough dishes and sampling sparkling meads. Further to an exploration and celebration of Slovenia’s rich culinary tradition, visitors can experience apitherapy in a typical Slovenian bee house, enjoy an invigorating honey massage or indulge themselves with thermotherapy.

Api tours also provide insight into the nature, heritage, traditions, foods and hospitality of Slovenia’s diverse regions: visitors are welcome to delight in Lake Bled, one of Europe’s most beautiful Alpine resorts, visit Postojna, the most visited show cave in Europe and search for the olm, enjoy Maribor, which boasts the world’s oldest living vine, and pay homage to the memory of a father of modern apitherapy, Dr. Filip Tertsch, see the white Lipizzaner horses at Lipica, relax on the Adriatic coast, take a swim in the sea or just enjoy a walk along the promenade at Portorož, indulge yourself at one of Slovenia’s famous thermal spas and taste the smoked air-dried prosciutto ham and the terra-rossa Teran wine of Slovenia’s Karst.

Apitherapy as an Important Segment of Apitourism and Wellbeing

In Slovenia the beekeepers place beds within bee houses, thereby transforming it into an apitherapeutic chamber where you can listen to the relaxing buzz of the bees. In the bee house, you can enjoy an organic honey massage or thermotherapy and enjoy the sweet and soothing fragrance of the hives. It is believed that pollen allergies can be cured by regularly inhaling a beehive.

“When we stand in front of the bee hive, we just have to say ourselves; the cosmos is entering my body, because everything that we need for life we can get from bees. Our forth fathers knew this instinctively; that’s why they placed a chair or bed beside their apiary and when the things were difficult they went in,”

says Slovenian apitherapist Mr Karl Vogrinčič who has combined traditional wisdom and his 40 years of beekeeping experiences to create a holistic apitherapy. In 2011 he set up an apiary with 27 traditional Slovenian Alberti-Žnidaršič hives and placed therapeutic areas with a beneficial microclimate within its walls. Inhaling the air in which floats a combination of pollen, honey and propolis from the hives helps to get rid of respiratory problems while the sound of the bees relaxes.

Apitourism Certificate of Excellence 

Slovenia is the first – and as yet the only – country to certify its apitourism service providers. Beside beekeepers apitourism also embraces various institutions, artisans and service providers, including open-air museums and beekeeping education routes, apitherapists, beehive front panel painters, honey confectioners, beeswax candle-makers, honey-bread and honey-pastry bakers, honey beverage producers, natural api-cosmetic and care product makers, bespoke and specialist gift makers as well as many others. In their provision of local produce and innovative wellness packages, some also offer food and accommodation to tourists, as well as the possibility to engage in sport and recreational activities. One, two or three bees in a symbol indicate individual providers according to the quality and attraction of their services, their use of nature-friendly materials, specialisation, innovation, efficiency, experience and setting. The new round of certification, to be completed this autumn, shall encompass some thirty apitourism service providers.

Apitourism, as a novel concept in travel and holidaying, has emerged and developed into an important component of the green economy. ApiRoutes is demonstrative of the need of having a clear vision, an innovative product and brand, indigenous knowledge, defined markets as well as highly motivated and fully involved partners. As ‘api tour operator’, Aritours offers a complete local service in organizing tours and excursions as well as educational programs. As a travel specialist with 20 years of experience, it boasts numerous satisfied customers. Its highly motivated staff and an extensive network of partners and co-workers are proud to offer high quality services which guarantee unique and unforgettable experiences. With its educational role, such tourism brings out the best in destinations and services, the best in people, the best in their perceptions and actions, and it transforms all this awareness and knowledge into an important value to take home, share and live by.

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World Bee Day Initiative has Started

7. mai 2015 - 23:53

Almost every day, there is some international observance day. We have an International Day of Peace, International Day of Peace, World Vegetarian Day, World Diabetes Day…

And now is the time to have World Bee Day, which will contribute to the awareness of the importance of bees and beekeeping.

Initiative for the World Bee Day is coming from Beekeeping Association in Slovenia.

In April of 2015 the Republic of Slovenia, on the basics of initiative of the Slovenian Beekeepers’ Association, proposes to the United Nations (UN) that the May 20th should be declared as World Bee Day.

According to post on Official Facebook Page the document on the World Bee Day initiative was prepared and transmitted also to EU Council (on 4 May), and in 11 May 2015 in Brussels they hope the EU Council will support them.

Why the May 20th?

On this day Anton Janša was born in 1734, a pioneer of modern beekeeping.

You are probably wondering who the hell is Anton Janša.

He was one of the greatest experts and he embodies the beekeeping in the right form. From World Bee Day Initiative Leaflet (.pdf) you can read that his life and work are described in many beekeeping books, including in The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting (Eva Craine, 1999).

World Bee Day

Why is Important to Have a World Bee Day?

Dejan Židan, MSc, (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Food) said:

The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food recognizes the importance of bees and beekeeping for ensuring food security, as well as preserving the entire ecosystem and natural biodiversity. Therefore, we strive to preserve and protect the bees in our territory and throughout the European Union.

In recent years, at the international level and due to its international activities related to bees and beekeeping, Slovenia has been identified as a country where this field has a special place and receives special care, the Slovenian Government has decided to further upgrade these activities and, at the initiative of Slovenian Beekeepers’ Association, to submit a proposal for the proclamation of the World Bee Day within the framework of the United Nations.

Short Video Presentation

Do you know that:
  • The oldest bee fossil ever found is between 25 to 50 million years.
  • Bee colony (within a year) consumes about 70 kg of honey and 20 – 30 kg of pollen.
  • Bee queen can in 24 hours lay up to 2,000 eggs, which are heavier than she itself.
  • A brooding of the eggs lasts just 10 seconds.
  • Bees live only 40 days (during the year).
  • The bees have to visit 4 million flowers to for just one kilogram of honey.

Sign up to our newsletter and follow the last update about World Bee Day :)

Source: www.mkgp.gov.si/en/world_bee_day_initiative/, www.facebook.com/worldbeeday and czs.si/content/wbd

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Honeybee Health Initiatives Award launched by Vita

1. märts 2015 - 0:30

Beekeeping associations across the world are invited to enter a new Vita award for honeybee health initiatives.

The Vita Bee Initiative Awards will highlight the vital work of voluntary beekeeping groups to combat the ongoing health threats to honeybees and publicise good practice for the benefit of other beekeepers.

Vita-europe-revard

Winners of the Award will receive trophies and equipment such as microscopes to a value of €250 to help them in maintaining healthy honeybee colonies. Entrants will also receive a limited edition booklet highlighting the best projects. Many projects will also be publicised online for the benefit of beekeeping communities across the world.

Jeremy Owen, Sales Director for Vita (Europe) Ltd, said: “As a honeybee health specialist with distributors across the world, we never cease to be impressed by the resourcefulness of beekeepers in countering the series of health threats that have put honeybee populations at risk in recent years.

“In our travels we have encountered initiatives to promote healthy honeybees and we thought it would be very valuable for these activities to gain a wider audience. We are therefore delighted to announce Vita Bee Initiative Awards recognising local honeybee health initiatives across the world.”

The Vita Bee Initiative Awards are open to any beekeeping group, large or small, in any part of the world. An international panel of beekeeping experts will adjudicate.

Examples of eligible projects or initiatives include
  • co-operation of neighbouring beekeepers to tackle a local or widespread honeybee health threat
  • schemes such as mentoring to help new beekeepers with a particular focus on honeybee health
  • providing access to specialist equipment to identify diseases
  • specialist courses, meetings or regular events to target particular health threats
  • online activities (websites, social media and/or email groups) addressing health issues for a particular beekeeping group
  • disease identification skills transfer to young, new or inexperienced beekeepers.

All sorts of initiatives will be eligible, but honeybee health should always be a significant if not the only focus of the entry. An indication of successful outcomes will be beneficial.

The closing date is 10 July 2015. Vita will announce the winners at Apimondia 2015 in Korea in September.

Entries should be submitted electronically to the email address provided on the form. Photographs, video, audio recordings and other supporting material may also be submitted.

Entries should contain the following information

Contact Details

Name
Organisation if appropriate
Address
Telephone
Email

Initiative Title (max 20 words)

Summary (max 150 words)

Initiative Outline including aims, who is involved, timescales, results (max 1000 words)

Additional materials Web links are preferred, but emailed attachments are acceptable if they do not exceed 4 MB in total.

For more information visit Vita Europe Ltd.

Source: Vita Europe Ltd.

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New perspectives on the cultivation of our honeybee – Farming for the Landless

26. veebruar 2015 - 1:57
Fresh Ideas to Forage

As this year’s honeybee foraging season approaches, a fresh bee book launches. On Sunday 1st March 2015, Farming for the Landless: New perspectives on the cultivation of our honeybee, Platin Press, will be presented for the first time by author Sarah Waring and ecologist Caroline Birchall (the Bee Collective and Buglife’s B-Lines) at Freightliners Farm, Islington, London.

“Devastating colony losses have resulted in rallying calls to ‘save our bees’. Media interest and a multitude of campaigns have rapidly raised public awareness. Concern for bees is now high but often fraught with popular myths.”

Farming-for-the-Landless-book-Cover

With so many facts, figures and comments about bees in circulation, it can be a challenge to appreciate their full significance. Farming for the Landless contextualises apiculture’s ecological and agricultural importance today. In this in-depth cultural study, current debate about pollination, forage, agricultural chemical use, parasites and viruses, breeding and rearing, queen and colony transportation, subspecies adaptation, and honeybee conservation are all presented in an accessible and engaging manner. Interviews with beekeepers, agricultural scientists and ecologists add first-hand accounts to analysis of recent events, historical precedents and future aspirations. Beekeeping across Europe is explored from the intensive agriculture of Romania to fallow post-war Kosovo, from remote sites in Slovenia and Sweden to the urban sprawl of Paris and London, from Austrian farmland to the largest agricultural region in Germany.

remote-beekeeping-sites-in-Slovenia

Remote Beekeeping Sites from Slovenia.

The book – Farming for the Landless asks: What might it mean to consider the conservation of a farmed creature?

“The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is a species on the cusp of culture and nature… If we’re to seriously improve honeybee health and with it our own wellbeing, we need to make the most of this timely opportunity to realise a more interconnected approach to agriculture and ecology.

This is a book for beekeepers, ecologists, scientists and nature enthusiasts, appealing to the non-farming landless community we have largely become.

sarah waringAbout the author

Sarah Waring lives and works in the UK and Italy. She studied Fine Art Photography at the Royal College of Art, lectured at the University of Westminster and University of the Arts and worked as a writer and media publishing editor in London… For more informations about the author and this book visit www.farmingforthelandless.com.

Source: www.farmingforthelandless.com

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