Uudiseid mujalt

Vital Signs - Meet: Mama Churi

Vimeo beekeeping - 27. august 2014 - 23:03

Vital Signs is a monitoring system that tracks agriculture, ecosystems and human, well-being to inform development decisions. This Vital Signs Field Spotlight episode presents the story of a local farmer in Tanzania and how she and her family depend on nature to thrive.

Cast: Conservation International

Tags: Conservation International, Tanzania, Vital Signs, Mama Churi, people, nature, agriculture, farmer and beekeeping

USA- IN SEPTEMBER WILL CELEBRATE THE VIRGINIA HONEY MONTH

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:55
USA- IN SEPTEMBER   WILL CELEBRATE  THE VIRGINIA HONEY MONTH

Governor Terence R. McAuliffe has declared the entire month of September as Honey Month

USA- TEACHING BEEKEEPING TO MARYLAND INMATES

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:50
USA- TEACHING BEEKEEPING TO MARYLAND INMATES

John Anderson  a  32-year-old inmate at Maryland Correctional Training Center south of Hagerstown works as a beekeeper at the prison under the tutelage of two correctional officers,   Lt. Jeff Golden and Cpl. Chuck Neikirk , who are masters of the craft.

USA- CALIFORNIA SEVERE DROUGHT IS AFFECTING THE HONEY INDUSTRY

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:43
USA- CALIFORNIA SEVERE DROUGHT IS AFFECTING THE HONEY INDUSTRY

Article written by Terence Chea

 

California’s record drought hasn’t been sweet to honeybees, and it’s creating a sticky situation for beekeepers and honey buyers.

The state is traditionally one of the country’s largest honey producers, with abundant crops and wildflowers that provide the nectar that bees turn into honey. But the lack of rain has ravaged native plants and forced farmers to scale back crop production, leaving fewer places for honeybees to forage.

The historic drought, now in its third year, is reducing supplies of California honey, raising prices for consumers and making it harder for beekeepers to earn a living.

“Our honey crop is severely impacted by the drought, and it does impact our bottom line as a business,” said Gene Brandi, a beekeeper in Los Banos, a farming town in California’s Central Valley.

The state’s deepening drought is having widespread impacts. More than 80 percent of the state is under “extreme” or “exceptional” drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Gov. Jerry Brown has declared a drought emergency, and residents now face fines of up to $500 a day for wasting water.

The drought is just the latest blow to honeybees, which pollinate about one third of U.S. agricultural crops. In recent years, bee populations worldwide have been decimated by pesticides, parasites and colony collapse disorder, a mysterious phenomenon in which worker bees suddenly disappear.

The drought is worsening a worldwide shortage of honey that has pushed prices to all-time highs. Over the past eight years, the average retail price for honey has increased 65 percent from $3.83 to $6.32 per pound, according to the National Honey Board.

Since the drought began, California’s honey crop has fallen sharply from 27.5 million pounds in 2010 to 10.9 million pounds last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And this year’s crop is expected to be even worse.

California was the country’s leading honey producer as recently as 2003, but it has since been surpassed by North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota and Florida. In 2013, California produced less than 10 percent of the country’s $317 million honey crop.

On a recent summer morning in Los Banos, swarms of honeybees surrounded Gene Brandi and his son Mike, wearing white helmets with mesh veils, as they cracked open wooden hives and inserted packets of protein supplement to keep the insects healthy.

This year their colonies have produced only about 10 percent of the honey they make in a good year, said Brandi, who is vice president of the American Beekeeping Federation.

Besides selling honey, beekeepers earn their living from pollinating crops such as almonds, cotton, alfalfa and melons. But farmers are renting fewer hives because the lack of irrigation water has forced them to tear out orchards and leave fields unplanted.

Like many beekeepers, Brandi is feeding his bees a lot more sugar syrup than usual to compensate for the lack of nectar. The supplemental feed keeps the bees alive, but it is expensive and doesn’t produce honey.

“Not only are you feeding as an expense, but you aren’t gaining any income.” said Brandi’s son Mike, who is also a beekeeper. “If this would persist, you’d see higher food costs, higher pollination fees and unfortunately higher prices for the commodity of honey.”

Many California beekeepers, including Gene Brandi’s brother, are taking their hives to states such as North Dakota where they can forage in clover and buckwheat fields.

The drought is hurting businesses such as Marshall’s Farm Honey, which supplies raw honey to high-end restaurants, grocery stores and farmers markets in Northern California.

The Napa Valley business is having trouble making and buying enough honey to meet the demands of its customers. Many varieties such as honey made from sage and star-thistle aren’t available at all because it’s too dry for their flowers to produce nectar.

“They keep coming back wanting more, and it’s very painful to have to say, ‘We don’t have it,’” said Helene Marshall, who runs the business with her husband Spencer. “There’s increased demand because of increased awareness of how good it is for you, and there is less supply.”

Spencer Marshall, who maintains hives throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, said this is by far the worst year for honey production he’s seen in five decades of beekeeping. When the drought ends, “the bees may come back, but the beekeepers may not,” Marshall said.

Amelia Barad-Humphries, who owns a restaurant and floral business in Napa Valley, said she’s concerned about the drought’s impact on bees and honey supplies. She said she eats a teaspoon of local honey every day to keep her allergies in check and she relies on bees to pollinate her backyard garden.

“We need honeybees for everything,” she said. “People should be paying attention.”

 

 

 

 

UNITED KINGDOM- NATURAL BEEKEEPING COURSE VIA INTERNET

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:30
UNITED KINGDOM- NATURAL BEEKEEPING COURSE VIA INTERNET

MyGardenSchool Gardening Courses Start on the First Saturday of Every Month.  You can book your course up to two months in advance

CHILE- GOVERNMENT AGENCY HELPS VII REGION BEEKEEPERS

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:17
CHILE- GOVERNMENT AGENCY HELPS VII REGION BEEKEEPERS

About 110 small beekeepers of the communes of Cauquenes and Chanco were benefited with supplementation for feeding their bees through sugar  through a INDAP special program to the areas most affected by water deficit, which have reduced natural availability of food for bees.

CANADA- NO GENETIC TRADEOFFS BETWEEN HYGIENIC BEHAVIOR AND INDIVIDUAL INNATE IMMUNITY IN THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:12
CANADA- NO GENETIC TRADEOFFS BETWEEN HYGIENIC BEHAVIOR AND INDIVIDUAL INNATE IMMUNITY IN THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA

Paper prepared by Brock A. Harpur,  Anna Chernyshova, Arash Soltani, Nadejda Tsvetkov, Mohammad Mahjoorighasrodashti, Zhixing Xu and  Amro Zayed. Please download attached document

 

 

 

Abstract

Many animals have individual and social mechanisms for combating pathogens. Animals may exhibit short-term physiological tradeoffs between social and individual immunity because the latter is often energetically costly. Genetic tradeoffs between these two traits can also occur if mutations that enhance social immunity diminish individual immunity, or vice versa. Physiological tradeoffs between individual and social immunity have been previously documented in insects, but there has been no study of genetic tradeoffs involving these traits. There is strong evidence that some genes influence both innate immunity and behaviour in social insects – a prerequisite for genetic tradeoffs. Quantifying genetic tradeoffs is critical for understanding the evolution of immunity in social insects and for devising effective strategies for breeding disease-resistant pollinator populations. We conducted two experiments to test the hypothesis of a genetic tradeoff between social and individual immunity in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. First, we estimated the relative contribution of genetics to individual variation in innate immunity of honey bee workers, as only heritable traits can experience genetic tradeoffs. Second, we examined if worker bees with hygienic sisters have reduced individual innate immune response. We genotyped several hundred workers from two colonies and found that patriline genotype does not significantly influence the antimicrobial activity of a worker’s hemolymph. Further, we did not find a negative correlation between hygienic behaviour and the average antimicrobial activity of a worker’s hemolymph across 30 honey bee colonies. Taken together, our work indicates no genetic tradeoffs between hygienic behaviour and innate immunity in honey bees. Our work suggests that using artificial selection to increase hygienic behaviour of honey bee colonies is not expected to concurrently compromise individual innate immunity of worker bees.

GERMANY- MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES OF THREE SYMPATRIC AUSTRALIAN STINGLESS BEE SPECIES

Apinews - 27. august 2014 - 15:07
GERMANY- MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES OF THREE SYMPATRIC AUSTRALIAN STINGLESS BEE SPECIES

Paper prepared by Sara D. Leonhardt  and  Martin Kaltenpoth. Please download attached document

 

 

 

Abstract

Bacterial symbionts of insects have received increasing attention due to their prominent role in nutrient acquisition and defense. In social bees, symbiotic bacteria can maintain colony homeostasis and fitness, and the loss or alteration of the bacterial community may be associated with the ongoing bee decline observed worldwide. However, analyses of microbiota associated with bees have been largely confined to the social honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus spec.), revealing – among other taxa – host-specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB, genus Lactobacillus) that are not found in solitary bees. Here, we characterized the microbiota of three Australian stingless bee species (Apidae: Meliponini) of two phylogenetically distant genera (Tetragonula and Austroplebeia). Besides common plant bacteria, we find LAB in all three species, showing that LAB are shared by honeybees, bumblebees and stingless bees across geographical regions. However, while LAB of the honeybee-associated Firm4–5 clusters were present in Tetragonula, they were lacking in Austroplebeia. Instead, we found a novel clade of likely host-specific LAB in all three Australian stingless bee species which forms a sister clade to a large cluster of Halictidae-associated lactobacilli. Our findings indicate both a phylogenetic and geographical signal of host-specific LAB in stingless bees and highlight stingless bees as an interesting group to investigate the evolutionary history of the bee-LAB association.

USA- POLLINATOR PROJECT IN NEW MEXICO STATE

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 16:24
USA- POLLINATOR PROJECT IN NEW MEXICO STATE

The entomologist Tessa Grasswitz, , and the agronomist and horticulturist David R. Dreesen, , both researchers at NMSU’s Los Lunas Agricultural Science Center and the USDA-NRCS Los Lunas Plant Materials Center, work together on the New Mexico Pollinator Project, which aims to conserve bees in New Mexico and educate people about the benefits of pollinators

USA- REQUEST FOR HONEYBEES RESEARCH PROPOSALS

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:57
USA- REQUEST FOR HONEYBEES RESEARCH PROPOSALS

The National Honey Board (NHB) is requesting proposals for research dealing with honey bee colony production. The goal of this research is to help producers maintain colony health while assuring the maintenance of honey quality. The NHB is encouraging  proposals on Varroa research, but will consider proposals dealing with Acarapis woodi, Nosema Ceranae, and small hive beetle; the investigation into the causes and controls of Colony Collapse Disorder; and honey bee nutrition, immunology, and longevity.  Proposals must be received at the National Honey Board office by 5:00p.m. Mountain Time, November 17, 2014.. Please download attached document

SPAIN- VESPA VELUTINA EXPANDS THEIR PRESENCE IN CATALUNYA

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:53
SPAIN- VESPA VELUTINA EXPANDS THEIR PRESENCE IN CATALUNYA

Beekeepers in Girona have located specimens of this invasive species in the Alt Empordà, Ripollès Garrotxa Garrotxa and the Garrotxa. Moreover, from the Association of Beekeepers say that wasps could reach the Barcelona areas of Osona and Bages

JAPAN- CUBAN AMBASSADOR VISIT HONEY PRODUCTS PRODUCTION PLANT

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:46
JAPAN- CUBAN AMBASSADOR VISIT HONEY PRODUCTS  PRODUCTION PLANT

Cuba's ambassador in Japan, Mr. Marcos Rodriguez, visited the company Yamada Bee  in Okayama Prefecture, where the Cuban organic honey is used  for the production of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and natural high quality supplements. During the tour of this family business with a turnover over 300 million dollars annually, Ambassador met with the  President  of Yamada Bee, Mr. Hideo Yamada.

VENEZUELA- ENDED THE FIRST BEEKEEPING TECHNICAL DAY OF THE ANDEAN REGION

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:43
VENEZUELA- ENDED THE FIRST BEEKEEPING TECHNICAL DAY OF THE ANDEAN REGION

Organized by FEBOAPIVE was conducted during the last weekend in the city of San Cristobal, Tachira state.

 

 

 

Logros realizados durante la jornada:

 

  • Acuerdo de cooperación entre el MPPAT y FEBOAPIVE para apoyar el desarrollo apícola del estado Táchira
  • Firma de los presentes de la solicitud ante el  Ministerio del Ambiente de declaración de las abejas como “PATRIMONIO NACIONAL”.
  • Acuerdo entre productores para crear la Asociación Bolivariana de apicultores del Táchira.

 

BRAZIL- AFRICAN BEES AND "AFRICANIZED" COLLECT FUNGI INSTEAD OF POLLEN

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:39

Article written by  Nikolaos Argyrios Mitsiotis. Plaese download attached document

USA- RECENT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH CONFIRMS THE ROLE OF PESTICIDES IN POLLINATORS DECLINE

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:36
USA- RECENT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH CONFIRMS THE ROLE OF PESTICIDES IN POLLINATORS DECLINE

Please download attached document

USA- GOVERNMENT OFFICE IS ANALYZING THE APPROVAL OF A NEW GM CROP WHICH USES A HIGHLY TOXIC ORANGE AGENT

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:34
USA-  GOVERNMENT OFFICE IS ANALYZING THE APPROVAL OF A NEW GM CROP WHICH USES A HIGHLY TOXIC ORANGE AGENT

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is on the verge of al­lowing into cultivation the latest round of genetically engineered (GE) crops -corn and soybeans engineered to be resistant to the highly toxic herbicide 2,4-D. The agency released its draft Environ­mental Impact Statement (DEIS) last December for public com­ment, announcing its plan to deregulate these crops. This is a dev­astating decision for farmers, the environment, and public health. 2,4-D, one ingredient in the deadly Agent Orange that was used to defoliate forests during the Vietnam war and the cause of se­vere illness in exposed veterans, will now enter the environment at elevated rates as integral to a cropping system that uses 2,4-D­tolerant engineered crops. This, despite decades of science show­ing that this chemical is highly toxic, linked to numerous short- and long-term health and environmental impacts. Please download attached document

ARGENTINA- NEW EDITION OF CAMPO Y ABEJAS RADIO PROGRAM

Apinews - 26. august 2014 - 15:31
ARGENTINA- NEW EDITION OF CAMPO Y ABEJAS RADIO PROGRAM

Aired yesterday

USA- CALIFORNIA SENATE KICKED AHEAD THE NEONICOTINOIDS PROBLEM

Apinews - 25. august 2014 - 16:15
USA- CALIFORNIA SENATE KICKED AHEAD THE NEONICOTINOIDS PROBLEM

In a blow to the adoption of urgently needed protections for pollinators, the California State Senate voted 35-1, after an earlier Assembly vote of 75-0, to delay a requirement for action on bee-harming neonicotinoid (neonic) pesticides until 2020. While advocates want mandates for regulatory action to protect bees, the timeline in the bill ignores that ongoing crisis faced by bees, beekeepers, and agriculture dependent on bee pollination. Assembly Bill 1789 provides the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CalDPR) another four years to reevaluate neonicotinoid pesticides, and an additional two years to implement any measures that would be needed to protect pollinator health. Given that CalDPR began its reevaluation of neonics in 2009, and existing law would have required a complete reevaluation within two years, the legislature’s new 2020 timeline has been met with strong criticism from beekeepers and environmental groups.

AUSTRALIA- IN THE NORTH EAST ARE EXPECTING A GOOD HONEY SEASON

Apinews - 25. august 2014 - 16:08
AUSTRALIA- IN THE NORTH EAST ARE EXPECTING A GOOD HONEY SEASON

North Eastern Apiarists’ Association treasurer, Rodney Whitehead, said the lead up to spring has been encouraging, with good rains over the winter. “Improved conditions for plant growth will, hopefully, be reflected in the capacity of both ground flora and eucalypts to yield pollen and nectar in both quality and quantity,” he said.

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