Uudiseid mujalt

ARGENTINA- MET THE BEEKEEPING COUNCIL OF THE PROVINCE OF SAN LUIS

Apinews - 22. august 2014 - 16:11
ARGENTINA-   MET THE BEEKEEPING COUNCIL OF THE PROVINCE OF SAN LUIS

The meeting was held at the premises of the Livestock Center of the town of Santa Rosa. The implementation of the Health Plan Bee 2015 was analyzed

 

 

USA- A CRITICAL NUMBER OF WORKERS IN A HONEYBEE COLONY TRIGGERS INVESTMENT IN REPRODUCTION

Apinews - 22. august 2014 - 16:06
USA- A CRITICAL NUMBER OF WORKERS IN A HONEYBEE COLONY TRIGGERS INVESTMENT IN REPRODUCTION

Paper prepared by Michael L. Smith, Madeleine M. Ostwald, J. Carter Loftus and  Thomas D. Seeley

 

Abstract

Social insect colonies, like individual organisms, must decide as they develop how to allocate optimally their resources among survival, growth, and reproduction. Only when colonies reach a certain state do they switch from investing purely in survival and growth to investing also in reproduction. But how do worker bees within a colony detect that their colony has reached the state where it is adaptive to begin investing in reproduction? Previous work has shown that larger honeybee colonies invest more in reproduction (i.e., the production of drones and queens), however, the term ‘larger’ encompasses multiple colony parameters including number of adult workers, size of the nest, amount of brood, and size of the honey stores. These colony parameters were independently increased in this study to test which one(s) would increase a colony’s investment in reproduction via males. This was assayed by measuring the construction of drone comb, the special type of comb in which drones are reared. Only an increase in the number of workers stimulated construction of drone comb. Colonies with over 4,000 workers began building drone comb, independent of the other colony parameters. These results show that attaining a critical number of workers is the key parameter for honeybee colonies to start to shift resources towards reproduction. These findings are relevant to other social systems in which a group’s members must adjust their behavior as a function of the group’s size.

USA- NEW EDITION OF THE POLLINATION STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL NEWSLETTER

Apinews - 22. august 2014 - 16:01
USA- NEW EDITION OF THE POLLINATION STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL NEWSLETTER

Corresponds to August 22, 2014

 

Pollinator News                                           Aug. 22, 2014 How you can protect and support honey bees

 

The New Jersey Beekeepers Association (NJBA) created a wonderful video, “Honey Bees and Other Pollinators – How You Can Protect and Support Them,” produced by NJBA member, Julie Jurusz, as part of a NJBA/USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant in 2012. The Video Committee was comprised of Co-Chairs Joseph Alvarez and Lorette Cheswick, Julie Jurusz (who also wrote the grant application at the behest of the late William Coniglio (a former NJBA president), and members Drew Mazdin, Steve McAuliffe and Debbie Cowell.

These devoted, enterprising NJ Beekeepers oversaw the video, and contracted with native plant nurseries in New Jersey to produce thousands of late forage flowers (Seaside Goldenrod, Zig Zag Goldenrod, Butterfly Weed and New England Aster) which were given out to the public at numerous 4-H, County and the State Fairs in New Jersey with planting instructions, a brochure with links to the video, and other resources for planting for pollinators. The committee also sourced seed, and have three test plots growing in southern New Jersey (in conjunction with Stockton State College), as well as central and northern New Jersey (with Ramapo College) as part of the grant. The committee is also researching and meeting with public utility companies to learn what is being done to help pollinators with ROW (Right-of-Way) plantings, and how they can partner with them to increase habitat for pollinators.

The video can be viewed here

Beekeepers are stewards

Stewardship is  “the conducting, supervising, or managing of something; especially: the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one's care,” so states Merriam-Webster.com.

Stewardship of our honey bees and native pollinators is foremost for beekeepers, and the Pollinator Stewardship Council.  Beekeepers are responsible for their honey bees; all of us are responsible for our native pollinators.  Managed honey bees are under a beekeepers' care and management.  Native pollinators are under all of our protection, and their policing is under our guidance.  Farmers are conscientious about their land: monitoring, observing, steering, and guarding it for future generations.  Farmers want to protect the land as good trustees, and to work with all partners in agriculture for sustainability.  Beekeepers and farmers are responsible for the stewardship of the land, the food grown, and the next crop and next generation of honey bees, and the next, and so on.  Beekeepers see the ecosystem through their honey bees.  Honey bees tell beekeepers when stewardship is lacking, harmful, and deadly.  Honey bees as managed pollinators, are an indicator species.  To remove an indicator species from aspects of the ecosystem is poor stewardship.  As good stewards we must be “careful and responsible,” managing the honey bees and native pollinators entrusted to our care.  “The act or activity of looking after, and making decisions about” honey bees and native pollinators is charged to our supervision.  To be good stewards of the land, of the food supply, of our honey bees and pollinators, beekeepers especially know the responsibility of our guardianship.  To be good stewards of our crops, honey bees and native pollinators must be healthy across the growing season, and available for all crops.  Stewardship is “the duty or function of watching or guarding for the sake of proper direction or control” of the food supply, of a healthy ecosystem where honey bees have nutritious food, in order to pollinate nutritious food for all other living things.

These are the obligations of a good steward.  These are the obligations of beekeepers and farmers.

 

Research

Imidacloprid contaminates the pollen of seed-coated crops : A high risk for bees

PDF slideshow which was presented at Apimondia (World Bee Congress) in 2009 by Dr Bonmatin of CNRS France. Everything that is presented in this PDF has been confirmed by subsequent research. Presented are the findings of Dr Luc Belzunces that chronic exposure to just 0.1ng of Imidacloprid killed bees after ten days -affecting colony strength.

 

No waxy residue for bees: Detecting neonicotinoid insecticides with CE-MS

"For the first time, analytical chemists from Spain and Germany have used a combination of capillary electrophoreses (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS) to detect neonicotinoid insecticides such as imidacloprid and acetamiprid.  Their method is not only quick and sensitive, but it can also detect these insecticides in complex samples such as beeswax.

 

Evening Primrose by any Other Name is a Moth Plant—USDA Blog

“Led by three scientists at the Chicago Botanic Garden, Krissa Skogen, Jeremie Fant and Norm Wickett, and with funding from the National Science Foundation, a team of scientists from 11 institutions is undertaking a large-scale research project to understand more about a unique group of plants and their associated pollinators: the evening primrose family (Onagraceae).  The team will share their results with botanists in the U.S. Forest Service so that results can be applied to land management practices to help the evening primrose and their associated moths continue to be resilient and thrive from generation to generation.”
This study supports the “June 20, 2014 Presidential Memorandum “Creating a Federal Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators.”

 

For other pollinator related news stories, videos, and research, visit our website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pollinator Stewardship Council

P.O. Box 304
Perkinston, MS 39573
www.pollinatorstewardship.org

Pitääkö hunajan torimyynnistä tehdä ilmoitus?

SML - 22. august 2014 - 12:00

Moni hunajantuottaja myy tuotteitaan mielellään esimerkiksi paikallisissa tapahtumissa ja markkinoilla. Alle 1 000 kiloa vuodessa hunajaa myyvän ei tarvitse tehdä myynnistä erillisiä ilmoituksia, vaan riittää, että alkutuotantoilmoitus on tehty.

Jos hunajaa on aikomus myydä alle 1 000 kiloa vuodessa suoraan kuluttajalle, niin oman tuotannon hunajaa saa lingota ja pakata ilman, että toiminnasta tarvitsee tehdä elintarvikehuoneistoilmoitusta. Riittää, että alkutuotantoilmoitus on tehty.

Alkutuotantoilmoituksen lisäksi hunajan myynnistä esimerkiksi torilla, tapahtumassa tai markkinoilla ei tarvitse tehdä muita ilmoituksia.

Myyntipaikalla (oma kunta vai jokin muu paikkakunta) ei tällöin ole ilmoitusvelvollisuuden kannalta merkitystä.

Jos myynti suoraan kuluttajille ylittää 1 000 kiloa vuodessa, on tehtävä elintarvikehuoneistoilmoitus. Sen jälkeen, kun elintarvikehuoneistoilmoitus on tehty, tuottaja voi myydä tätä hunajaa oman kunnan alueella ilman muita ilmoituksia.

Jos tuottaja myy toisen kunnan alueelle hunajaa ja on tehnyt omaan kuntaan elintarvikehuoneistoilmoituksen, tuottajan täytyy tiedottaa myynnistä kyseisen myyntipaikan elintarvikeviranomaiselle viimeistään neljä päivää aiemmin.

Jos myy toisen tuottajan hunaja, myynnistä on aina tehtävä elintarvikehuoneistoilmoitus.

Eviran uudisti ulkomyyntiohjeensa vuonna 2012. Edelleen osalle valvojista voi olla totuttelemista muutokseen eli siihen, ettei torimyyjistä tai pienien tapahtumien elintarvikemyyjistä saa ennakkotietoa, mikäli elintarvikemyyjät kuuluvat siihen ryhmään, joiden ei tarvitse tehdä elintarvikehuoneistoilmoitusta toiminnasta.

Lue lisää aiheesta nettisivuiltamme. Tutustu myös mehiläishoitajan viranomaisvelvollisuuksia käsittelevään tekstiin.

NEW ZEALAND- ON THE FRONT LINE: QUANTITATIVE VIRUS DYNAMICS IN HONEYBEE (APIS MELLIFERA L.) COLONIES ALONG A NEW EXPANSION FRONT OF THE PARASITE VARROA DESTRUCTOR

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 23:45
 QUANTITATIVE VIRUS DYNAMICS IN HONEYBEE (APIS MELLIFERA L.) COLONIES ALONG A NEW EXPANSION FRONT OF THE PARASITE VARROA DESTRUCTOR

Paper prepared by Fanny Mondet,  Joachim R. de Miranda,  Andre Kretzschmar,  Yves Le Conte and  Alison R. Mercer. Please download attached document

 

 

 

Abstract

Over the past fifty years, annual honeybee (Apis mellifera) colony losses have been steadily increasing worldwide. These losses have occurred in parallel with the global spread of the honeybee parasite Varroa destructor. Indeed, Varroa mite infestations are considered to be a key explanatory factor for the widespread increase in annual honeybee colony mortality. The host-parasite relationship between honeybees and Varroa is complicated by the mite's close association with a range of honeybee viral pathogens. The 10-year history of the expanding front of Varroa infestation in New Zealand offered a rare opportunity to assess the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes in honeybee viral landscapes in response to the arrival, spread and level of Varroa infestation. We studied the impact of de novo infestation of bee colonies by Varroa on the prevalence and titres of seven well-characterised honeybee viruses in both bees and mites, using a large-scale molecular ecology approach. We also examined the effect of the number of years since Varroa arrival on honeybee and mite viral titres. The dynamic shifts in the viral titres of black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus mirrored the patterns of change in Varroa infestation rates along the Varroa expansion front. The deformed wing virus (DWV) titres in bees continued to increase with Varroa infestation history, despite dropping infestation rates, which could be linked to increasing DWV titres in the mites. This suggests that the DWV titres in mites, perhaps boosted by virus replication, may be a major factor in maintaining the DWV epidemic after initial establishment. Both positive and negative associations were identified for several pairs of viruses, in response to the arrival of Varroa. These findings provide important new insights into the role of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in influencing the viral landscape that affects honeybee colonies.

UNITED KINGDOM- A VIRULENT STRAIN OF DEFORMED WING VIRUS (DWW) OF HONEYBEES (APIS MELLIFERA) PREVAILS AFTER VARROA DESTRUCTOR-MEDIATED, OR IN VITRO, TRANSMISSION

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 23:38
UNITED KINGDOM- A VIRULENT STRAIN OF DEFORMED WING VIRUS (DWW) OF HONEYBEES (APIS MELLIFERA) PREVAILS AFTER VARROA DESTRUCTOR-MEDIATED, OR IN VITRO, TRANSMISSION

Paper prepared by Eugene V. Ryabov,  Graham R. Wood,  Jessica M. Fannon,  Jonathan D. Moore,  James C. Bull,  Dave Chandler,  Andrew Mead,  Nigel Burroughs and David J. Evans. Please download attached document

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract

The globally distributed ectoparasite Varroa destructor is a vector for viral pathogens of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera), in particular the Iflavirus Deformed Wing Virus (DWV). In the absence of Varroa low levels DWV occur, generally causing asymptomatic infections. Conversely, Varroa-infested colonies show markedly elevated virus levels, increased overwintering colony losses, with impairment of pupal development and symptomatic workers. To determine whether changes in the virus population were due Varroa amplifying and introducing virulent virus strains and/or suppressing the host immune responses, we exposed Varroa-naïve larvae to oral and Varroa-transmitted DWV. We monitored virus levels and diversity in developing pupae and associated Varroa, the resulting RNAi response and transcriptome changes in the host. Exposed pupae were stratified by Varroa association (presence/absence) and virus levels (low/high) into three groups. Varroa-free pupae all exhibited low levels of a highly diverse DWV population, with those exposed per os (group NV) exhibiting changes in the population composition. Varroa-associated pupae exhibited either low levels of a diverse DWV population (group VL) or high levels of a near-clonal virulent variant of DWV (group VH). These groups and unexposed controls (C) could be also discriminated by principal component analysis of the transcriptome changes observed, which included several genes involved in development and the immune response. All Varroa tested contained a diverse replicating DWV population implying the virulent variant present in group VH, and predominating in RNA-seq analysis of temporally and geographically separate Varroa-infested colonies, was selected upon transmission from Varroa, a conclusion supported by direct injection of pupae in vitro with mixed virus populations. Identification of a virulent variant of DWV, the role of Varroa in its transmission and the resulting host transcriptome changes furthers our understanding of this important viral pathogen of honeybees.

USA- BEEKEEPING SEMINAR IN BALTIMORE

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 22:47
USA- BEEKEEPING SEMINAR IN BALTIMORE

On Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014  from 10 a.m. until 4pm sponsored by the Howard County Beekeepers Association, at the Robinson Nature Center.  The program will include  bee biology, beekeeping equipment, how and why to keep bees and what products come from the hive.

USA- LA NIÑA AND EL NIÑO FORECAST

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 21:53
USA- LA NIÑA AND EL NIÑO FORECAST

Prepared on August  2014 by The International Research Institute for Climate and Society

USA- WORLDWIDE TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION FORECAST

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 21:43
USA- WORLDWIDE TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION FORECAST

Prepared on  August 2014 by The International Research Institute for Climate and Society

 

 

 

 

 

USA- EARLY DIABETIS DETECTION SYSTEM USING HONEYBEES

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 21:28
USA- EARLY DIABETIS DETECTION  SYSTEM USING HONEYBEES

According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes has accelerated the most in urbanized areas of developing countries due to higher risk factors such as lack of physical activity and easy access to fast food. The threat of diabetes in developing countries is particularly worrying as over a third of those living with diabetes are unaware of their health situation. Late diagnosis and delay in diabetes management can lead to many health complications and a higher rate of morbidity.

GEORGIA- DISCOVER FRUITS PRESERVED IN HONEY IN THE PREHISTORIC PERIOD

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 21:12
GEORGIA- DISCOVER FRUITS PRESERVED IN HONEY IN THE PREHISTORIC PERIOD

In  Georgia discovered a mound of the Early Bronze Age. From beneath the burial mound, archaeologists have drawn wild fruits in good condition that had been placed in the tomb as food for the souls of the dead and had been underground for thousands of years. However, they were so well preserved that, after uncovering the grave, smelled as fresh fruit.

 

 

La edad del bronce dió  inició en el  Próximo Oriente a finales del IV milenio a.C., en Asia Menor antes del 3000 a. C.; en la antigua Grecia a mediados del 3000 a. C.; en Asia Central alrededor del 2000 a. C., en Afganistán, Turkmenistán e Irán y en China desde  1800 a. C.

SPAIN- CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A NEW APPROACH TO ANALYZE NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDES

Apinews - 21. august 2014 - 21:06
SPAIN- CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A NEW APPROACH TO ANALYZE NEONICOTINOID INSECTICIDES

Paper prepared by  Laura Sánchez-Hernández, Deamelys Hernández-Domínguez, José Bernal, Christian Neusü, María T. Martín and  José L. Bernal

 

 

Highlights

  • Neonicotinoid insecticides were analyzed by CE–ESI-MS for the first time.
  • The seven neonicotinoids were simultaneously determined in less than 11 min.
  • Low limits of quantification were achieved for all compounds (3.5–7.2 μg/L).
  • Trace levels of neonicotinoids were monitored in beeswax with the proposed method.
  • Oxalic acid has proven to be effective to remove neonicotinoids from beeswax.

 

Abstract

This paper represents the first report of a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method compatible with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for simultaneously analyzing seven neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam). Different variables affecting CE separation (buffer concentration, pH, applied voltage and injection time) and MS detection (electrospray parameters) were studied. Low limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were achieved for all analytes, ranging from 1.0 to 2.3 μg/L, and from 3.5 to 7.2 μg/L, respectively. In addition, the proposed method showed itself to be linear in the range from LOQ to 1000 μg/L and to be precise, as the relative standard deviations of the migration times were lower than 4% in all cases. Finally, the proposed CE–MS method was applied to assess the efficacy of a beeswax cleaning treatment with oxalic acid to remove residues of three of the most commonly used neonicotinoids (clothianidin

 

 

USA- HONEY IMPORTS JUNE 2014

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 18:27
USA- HONEY IMPORTS JUNE 2014

During the month were imported 17,401 tons (+ 13.6%) , total  61.1 million dollars (+ 28.8%) at an average price in dollars per ton of 3,517 (+ 13.5%). In the year were imported  81,179 tonnes (-3.3%)  total d 281 million dollars (+ 5.1%) at an average price in dollars per ton of 3,458 (+ 8.9%). All percentage values with reference  to the same period last year. Please download the attached document

EE.UU.- IMPORTACIONES DE MIEL EN JUNIO 2014

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 18:27
EE.UU.- IMPORTACIONES DE MIEL EN JUNIO 2014

En el mes se importaron

USA- HARVARD PROFESSOR SUSPECTS THAT HIVE COLLAPSES ARE CAUSED BY PESTICIDES, WHICH ALSO COULD HURT HUMAN HEALTH

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:42
USA- HARVARD PROFESSOR SUSPECTS THAT HIVE COLLAPSES ARE CAUSED BY PESTICIDES, WHICH ALSO COULD HURT HUMAN HEALTH

Article written by  Alvin Powell

 

 

 

 

It’s become something of a rite of spring. Every March, newspaper stories sprout about local beekeepers opening their hives to find an ongoing environmental mystery.

Instead of hungry bees ready for the first flights of spring, honeycombs that should be empty after a long winter are full, and instead the hives are empty. For some reason, during winter’s coldest months, these bees chose to leave the hive to perish outside.

Colony collapse disorder, as the condition is known, remains a mystery with troubling implications for the fate of the human food supply, which depends, in part, on pollinators like the honeybee. Explanations that have been offered include pathogens, modern beekeeping practices, malnutrition, climate change, and pesticides.

It is that last possible cause that stands out to Harvard School of Public Health’s (HSPH) Chengsheng (Alex) Lu, an associate professor of environmental exposure biology, who believes that the potential human health implications of colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination — though that is worrisome enough — to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons like neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been suspected in the bee disorder. To Lu, it is an open question whether there are links between the pesticide and the recent increase in neurological conditions in children such as autism and ADHD.

Western_honey_bee

Lu has continued to investigate the possible links among neonicotinoids, bees, and human health, saying the honeybee is a good model organism for potential pesticide impact, as well as for potential effects across generations. Credit: Wikipedia

To get to the bottom of the mystery, Lu has conducted pioneering research on the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on honeybees. In a study published in 2012, he replicated colony collapse disorder experimentally, feeding bees sugar water with different levels of neonicotinoids over 13 weeks in the summer and watching what happened.

At first, nothing did. The hives seemed unaffected and healthy as they got ready for winter. Then, the week before Christmas, roughly three months after the neonicotinoid treatment was halted, hives began to fail. Eventually 15 of 16 hives collapsed, even those treated with the lowest dose.

The work was noted for providing a concrete link to neonicotinoids, which are the world’s most widely used group of insecticides.

One particularly disturbing aspect of the work, which Lu described during a lunchtime “Hot Topics” talk on Aug. 12 at HSPH’s Kresge Building, is that the bees that abandoned the hive during the collapse weren’t the individuals that ate the sugar water laced with neonicotinoids. During summer’s period of high activity, bees live just 35 days, so the colony that collapsed contained the next generation of bees, indicating that the effect may have been passed on between generations.

Lu has continued to investigate the possible links among neonicotinoids, bees, and human health, saying the honeybee is a good model organism for potential pesticide impact, as well as for potential effects across generations.

Neonicotinoids, chemicals similar to the nicotine produced by tobacco plants, have become widespread in part because of their ease of use, Lu said. Because they’re water-soluble, the chemicals are taken up by a plant and spread throughout its tissues. Seed companies have made distribution even easier for farmers by coating seeds with the chemical, which ensures the plants sprouting from them contain the pesticide.

The chemicals are present not just in food plants, but are also widely represented in nursery stock, including plants sold at major garden retailers, Lu said. They’re also found in the environment, and Lu said there are questions about their role in the loss of birds and aquatic invertebrates.

Lu described it as a race against time to save the bees, which are routinely transported around the country by commercial beekeepers to pollinate agricultural fields. He spoke to one blueberry farmer who said that before colony collapse disorder struck, he would pay $250,000 to have his fields pollinated. Today that figure stands at $750,000, and the cost is passed on to consumers.

Lu believes that the pesticide is fed to bees by unsuspecting beekeepers. The pesticide is widely used on corn, which is used to make high-fructose corn syrup. The corn syrup is mixed with water and routinely fed to bees by commercial beekeepers.

Affected bees, which include wild honeybees, Lu said, exhibit a range of neurological conditions, including disorientation, flying back to the wrong colonies, and abandoning colonies in winter.

“The [phrase] ‘bee-line’ is no longer valid,” Lu said. “The question … is do these things also apply to human health?”

EEC- REPORT SHOWS TRACEABILITY IN THE TOP OF THE SAFETY REGULATIONS IN THE EU

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:36
EEC- REPORT SHOWS TRACEABILITY IN THE TOP OF THE SAFETY REGULATIONS IN THE  EU

Published in Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, the report evaluates and compares the traceability regulations of 21 Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries – finding that EU countries ranked highest when it comes to global food traceability regulations and requirements. According to the report, which ranked each country based on aggregated responses to a series of questions developed to assess their traceability policies and programs, EU member states and the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries of Norway and Switzerland, all scored as ‘Superior’.

USA- CALL FOR COMMENTS OF THE FEDERAL STANDARD OF IDENTITY FOR HONEY

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:29
USA- CALL FOR COMMENTS OF THE FEDERAL STANDARD OF IDENTITY FOR HONEY

The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) of the Department of Agriculture (USDA) is soliciting comments on how a Federal standard of identity for honey would be in the interest of consumers, the honey industry, and U.S. agriculture. Comments must be received by September 19, 2014.

 

 

 

Interested persons are invited to submit written comments via the Internet or to Brian E. Griffin, Standardization Branch, Specialty Crops Inspection Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., Room 0709-South Building; STOP 0247, Washington, DC 20250; telephone (202) 720-5021; fax (202) 690-1527,  or by email .

Comments should make reference to the date and page number of this issue of the Federal Register and will be made available for public inspection at the above office during regular business hours.Show citation box

Please be advised that all comments submitted in response to this notice will be included in the record and will be made available to the public on the Internet . Also, the identity of the individuals or entities submitting the comments will be made public.

SPAIN- ONE QUARTER OF THE BEEHIVES IN GALICIA ARE AFFECTED BY VESPA VELUTINA

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:24
SPAIN- ONE QUARTER OF THE BEEHIVES  IN  GALICIA ARE AFFECTED BY VESPA VELUTINA

The Galician Beekeepers Association estimates that between 20,000 and 25,000 hives in Galicia have been attacked in recent weeks by the Asian hornet, especially in the municipalities of Vivero, Burela and Foz. "There are 109,000 registered hives of bees and one in four is damaged by the Asian hornet, between 20,000 and 25,000" calculated the technical secretary of the organization, Xesús Asorey

SPAIN- ONE QUARTER OF THE COLONY IN GALICIA ARE AFFECTED BY VESPA VELUTINA

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:24
SPAIN- ONE QUARTER OF THE COLONY IN  GALICIA ARE AFFECTED BY VESPA VELUTINA

The Galician Beekeepers Association estimates that between 20,000 and 25,000 hives in Galicia have been attacked in recent weeks by the Asian hornet, especially in the municipalities of Vivero, Burela and Foz. "There are 109,000 registered hives of bees and one in four is damaged by the Asian hornet, between 20,000 and 25,000" calculated the technical secretary of the organization, Xesús Asorey

ARGENTINA- DELIVER HELP TO A ENTRE RIOS PROVINCE BEEKEEPING COOPERATIVE

Apinews - 20. august 2014 - 17:21
ARGENTINA- DELIVER HELP TO A ENTRE RIOS PROVINCE BEEKEEPING COOPERATIVE

The provincial government provided funds to 360.815 pesos to the  Beekeeping Cooperative Ayuí benefiting 15 families

Syndicate content